Tag: rocky planets

Rethinking The Snow Line

This image of the planet-forming disc around the young star V883 Orionis was obtained by ALMA in long-baseline mode. This star is currently in outburst, which has pushed the water snow line further from the star and allowed it to be detected for the first time. The dark ring midway through the disc is the water snowline, the point from the star where the temperature and pressure dip low enough for water ice to form.

This planet-forming disc around the young star V883 Orionis was obtained by the European Southern Observatory’s  Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), a prime site for radio astronomy. The star is a state of “outburst,” which has pushed the water snow line further from the star and allowed it to be detected for the first time. The dark ring midway through the disc is the water snowline, the point from the star where the temperature and pressure dip low enough for water ice to form.  ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)/L. Cieza

In every planet-forming disk there’s a point where the heat from a host star needed to keep H2O molecules as vapor peters out, and the H2O be becomes a solid crystal.  This is the snow line, and it looms large in most theories of planet formation.

Most broadly, planets formed inside the snow line will generally be rocky and small — a function of the miniscule dust grains that begin the planet forming process.  But outside the snow line the grains get coated by the icy H2O and so are much bigger, leading to gas and ice giant planets.

The existence of water snow lines (and for other molecules, too) is nothing new, but an image of a water snow line would be.  And now an international team led by Lucas Cieza of Universidad Diego Portales in Santiago, Chile, has found the water vapor/ice line around a very young star 1,350 light-years away. The results were published in 2016 journal Nature.

Using a high-precision radio astronomy array in Chile’s Atacama Desert, the team had been looking into whether the massive bursts of young stars might be caused by a theorized collapse into them of fragments of the disk.  But instead they detected and imaged the water snow line instead.

The image itself is an achievement, but what makes the finding especially intriguing is that the snow line was found at an entirely unexpected and enormous distance from the star — more than 42 astronomical units, or forty-two times the distance from our sun to Earth.

That would it was warm enough for H2O to remain a vapor roughly as far out as the orbit of the dwarf planet Pluto around the sun.  A more typical early star snow line is expected to be around 3 AU, an region between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.

Brenda Matthews, an astronomer at the National Research Council of Canada not involved in the study, wrote in an accompanying column that the snow line finding challenges some traditional models of planet formation.… Read more

Big Bangs

Collisions between planets, planetesimals and other objects are common in the galaxies and essential for planet formation. Researchers are focusing on these collisions for clues into which exoplanets have greater or lesser potentials habitability. (NASA)

Collisions between planets, planetesimals and other objects are common in the galaxies and essential for planet formation. Researchers are focusing on these collisions for clues about which exoplanets have greater or lesser potential habitability. (NASA)

What can get the imagination into super-drive more quickly than the crashing of really huge objects?

Like when a Mars-sized planet did a head-on into the Earth and, the scientific consensus says, created the moon.  Or when a potentially dinosaur-exterminating asteroid heads towards Earth, or when what are now called  “near-Earth objects” seems to be on a collision course.  (There actually aren’t any now, as far as I can tell from reports.)

But for scientists, collisions across the galaxies are not so much a doomsday waiting to happen, but rather an essential commonplace and a significant and growing field of study.

The planet-forming centrality of collisions — those every-day crashes of objects from grain-sized to planet-sized within protoplanetary disks — has been understood for some time; that’s how rocky planets come to be.  In today’s era of exoplanets, however, they have taken on new importance: as an avenue into understanding other solar systems, to understanding the composition and atmospheres of exoplanets, and to get some insight into their potential habitability.

And collision models, it now seems likely, can play a not insignificant role in future decision-making about which planetary systems will get a long look from the high-demand, high-cost space telescopes that will launch and begin observing in the years ahead.

“We’re learning that these impacts have a lot of implications for habitability,” said Elisa Quintana, a NASA Ames Research Center and SETI Institute research scientist who has been modeling space collisions.  Her paper was published in 2016 in the Astrophysical Journal, and took the modeling into new realms.

“When you think of what we know about impacts in general, we know they can effect a planet’s spin rate and rotation and consequently its weather,  they can bring water and gases to a planet or they can destroy an atmosphere and let the volatiles escape.  They effect the relationship between the planet’s core and mantle, and they determine the compositions of the planets.  These are all factors in increasing or decreasing a planet’s potential for habitability.”

 

An artist rendering of a protoplanetart disk around a newly-formed star. Tiny grains of dust grow over millions of years into planets through collisions and the accretion of matter. (NASA)

An artist rendering of a protoplanetary disk around a newly-formed star. Tiny grains of dust grow over millions of years into planetesimals and planets through collisions and the accretion of matter.

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